Jan
21
2014

She didn’t have to be asked twice. Rosie O’Donnell will join the hit ABC Family series The Fosters on Monday, Jan. 20 (9/8c), for a multi-episode storyline. Her role: Rita Hendricks, the tough-love operator of a group home that takes in runaway Callie Jacob (Maia Mitchell). TV Guide Magazine spoke with O’Donnell — actress, activist and super-Tweeter — about landing this cool new gig on one of her favorite shows.

TV Guide Magazine: Aren’t you kind of livingThe Fosters in real life?
O’Donnell: That’s exactly what my 11-year-old daughter, Vivi, said! She’s a big fan of ABC Family — she loves Twisted and Pretty Little Liars and all those programs — and one day she was all excited about this new show coming on. “It’s just like us — two mommies and bunch of different kids. Let’s watch!” So we did, and I was extremely moved by it.

TV Guide Magazine: Did you approach the show about a role? Or did they come after you?
O’Donnell: I googled The Fosters and found out Peter Paige, whom I worked with on Queer as Folk, was the co-creator. I emailed him to say how much my family loved the show and he wrote back and asked if I’d do a role. I said, “In a minute!”

TV Guide Magazine: We find out early on that your character is a food addict. Are there other revelations in store?
O’Donnell: Rita has some pretty deep reasons for getting into this line of work and a real Achilles’ heel. You’ll find out why she’s not able to treat herself as well as she’s able to treat these troubled kids. They remind her of what she once was. You know, this group-home thing is something a lot of people in this country don’t know about. There are safe places like these in almost every community where kids who are aging out of foster care are living together, usually with one social worker and a couple of young associates, in an effort to reconnect those wires that somehow were snipped, those synapses that don’t quite fire in their brains. It’s a great social system that helps these kids survive what has become a very hidden epidemic in this nation. The independent-living home you see on The Fosters involves no bars on the window, no lockdown. Just trust.

TV Guide Magazine: How would your life have been different if there was a show like The Fosters when you were growing up?
O’Donnell: God, I can’t even imagine! I remember going to church as a kid and hearing the priest talk about Soap and how horrible it was to have a gay character on TV. That’s stuff you carry with you for life. Remember that sitcom Love, Sidney in the early ’80s? Tony Randall played a gay man but the only real reference that he’d once had a male partner was having him look lovingly at a photo on the mantelpiece every once in a while, and that show was cancelled in a second. Things didn’t really start to change in a big way until Will & Grace came along. [Laughs] And when I heard the premise of that show I was sure it was doomed! Last year, when DOMA was declared unconstitutional, I changed internally in a way that surprised me. I suddenly realized how much shame I’d been carrying because I did not feel equal. Now the world is shifting and there’s so much more acceptance and understanding, especially within the younger generation. The Fostershas done an awful lot to help that.

TV Guide Magazine: In your wildest dreams, did you ever imagine you’d see such changes?
O’Donnell: Never. I’m still kind of in shock. I came out of my therapist’s office a couple of months ago and I see two teenage girls holding hands and walking through the parking lot. I stopped them and said, “Excuse me, are you guys a couple?” They were kind of sensitive and weirded out at first but they said, “Yeah.” And so I asked them, “Then it’s cool with your parents and the people at your school? You’re just so beautifully in love and so comfortable with each other!” I was getting really choked up. I said, “I’m 51-years-old and I’m gay.” [Laughs] And they were like, “Oh, uh…well, congratulations!” They didn’t really understand what it meant for someone my age to see that, especially having just come from my shrink where I was talking through my feelings about DOMA. This generation — four generations from my own childhood — is able to live in a fairly shame-free way and that is so fantastic and overwhelming to me. That said, I don’t really think of The Fosters as a gay show.

TV Guide Magazine: Why’s that?
O’Donnell: It’s a family drama about a clan that just happens to be headed by two lesbians. It’s about how families come together nowadays. In that same way, I don’t consider it a biracial show, just because one of the moms is African-American. It’s about very recognizable, very relatable, really wonderful people. Vivi does have one complaint — that the mommies don’t kiss enough. I told that to Peter Paige and he said, “That’s an indication you’re in a good and happy marriage and your child recognizes that. Because a lot people who watch our show say, ‘Why do those women kiss so damn much?’”

TV Guide Magazine: Is Vivi pushing for a guest appearance?
O’Donnell: She is dying to be on The Fosters! She’s like, “Mom, why can’t you tell them to write me in? I definitely want to be on this show. I definitely mean it!” And I say, “Honey, that’s not how the entertainment business works!” And she fires back: “Well, what about Will Smith’s kids? They have record deals! They’re in movies!”

TV Guide Magazine: You do kind of owe her. You probably wouldn’t be on The Fosterswithout her, right?
O’Donnell: Hey, you’ll get no argument from Vivi. She says, “You wouldn’t have even known about this show or ABC Family if it wasn’t for me! You didn’t even like Pretty Little Liars until I made you watch it with me in a binge weekend!” It’s true. [Laughs] I can’t argue with that!

Article from:  TVGuide.com

Jan
17
2014

Jan
14
2014

Mrs. and Mrs. Foster are caught up enjoying their honeymoon stage. After all it’s only the day after. Stef’s mother, Sharon, has been helping out the family cleaning up post-wedding and she’s been in charge of the kids. Yet no one knew Callie was missing. Brandon had tried to question it when he didn’t see her at breakfast, but Jude covered for her by saying she was at guitar practice.

Sharon waited until she had a minute alone with her daughter before she addressed what’s been concerning her. She wanted to make sure Stef had full thought it through about the whole adoption thing. She just wanted to point out that Stef and Lena already have their hands full with three kids. Could they afford to take on two more? Stef thinks so. She reassures her mother that they did think it over and they wanted to go through with it.

As for Callie, she’s on the road with Wyatt. Wyatt is meeting up with his family and before he gets there he double checked with Callie that he wasn’t harboring a fugitive or anything.  She didn’t tell him the truth, but she did admit she couldn’t go back home. She told him that she didn’t want to enter the system again and pretty soon that’s exactly were the Fosters were going to send her.

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Jan
14
2014

So The Fosters finally returned last night! It has been a long wait and it was totally worth it. Now I am getting back into the grove of updating and uploaded last night’s episode screencaptures. Make sure to check out the screencaptures below.

Jan
14
2014

Jan
10
2014

ABC Family has had a wide range of series over the past few years, but one of the best new shows in its lineup is The Fosters. The show, which premiered last summer, will be returning for its midseason premiere on Jan. 13 and we can’t wait. If you’re on the fence about whether The Fosters is for you, here are some reasons to catch up before the new season begins.

Solid Teen Drama
We can all admit that we enjoy teen dramas. The audience of Pretty Little Liars certainly isn’t made up exclusively of teenaged viewers — there’s definitely some twenty-somethings out there watching it! Besides, we were all in high school once, we can still relate to teenagers, or we can tell them how they’re ruining their lives, either way it’s fun to watch.

Totally Relevant
The Fosters is about an a typical family consisting of two female life partners, one biological son, two adopted children, and two foster children. Plus, the son’s biological father is in the picture. It makes for a lot of drama, but also a lot of heartfelt moments that will have you appreciating your own family — no matter how atypical they are.

Perfect for Binge-watching
Like many teen dramas, the plot lines aren’t too convoluted (it’s no Doctor Who) so it’s easy to sit down and watch the first 10 episodes in one day. Besides, half the episodes end with cliffhangers. You’ll be hitting play on the next episode before you even realize what you’re doing.

It’s Actually Good
Even for those who avidly love TV aimed toward teenagers can admit that a lot of those shows can be fairly trashy, but The Fosters — while slightly soap opera-esque — is a really descent series. Similar to Switched at Birth, The Fosters shines a light on a community of people who are rarely represented on television, and that’s awesome.

Article from: Hollywood.com

Jan
10
2014

Sherri Saum is pregnant with twins and “The Fosters” star stopped by Access Hollywood Live on Thursday, where she gave a pregnancy update to Billy Bush and Kit Hoover.

“I am five months-ish. There are two! We had the ultrasound again yesterday and they are chillin’,” the actress said.

Sherri and husband were initially told she was pregnant with just one baby.

“We were thrilled. We were like, ‘Awesome! A baby!’ And then the next ultrasound [the doctor] was like, ‘Uh… looks like there’s a freeloader in there hiding,’” she said with a laugh. “I was just in shock for about two weeks. My husband and I were just like, ‘This is really happening!’”

“I had a little in the beginning, but now it’s totally gone and all I wanna do is eat bread all day long!” she shared.

As for the babies’ due date, Sherri said the twins are due in “May-ish,” but added that “they say with twins they may come early, so I don’t know!”

“The Fosters” returns to ABC Family on January 13 at 9/8c.

Article from: AccessHollywood.com

Jan
9
2014

Jan
9
2014

Maia Mitchell recently did an interview with JustJaredJr.com where she talked about her character, Callie, in The Fosters. Maia touched on what you can expect from Callie running away and her relationship with Brandon (David Lambert). Check out the interview below:

JustJaredJr: So a lot happened in the finale last summer. Where do we pick up?

Maia Mitchell: So Callie just ran away because she and Brandon, in sort of a weak moment, gave into their feelings for each another, which is obviously forbidden. She runs away and I think we see the whole family, including Callie, dealing with the repercussions of that. Brandon and Jude are feeling quite guilty for her leaving. We’ll see Callie at her most lost. She has nowhere to go and no one to call, so you really really see her struggling. She’s with Wyatt for a while and things get worse, and she ends up being completely lost. At the end of the first episode, she makes a strong, difficult, gutsy decision that I think is going to shock everyone, which I’m really excited to see.

JJJ: We hear Rosie O’Donnell‘s character interacts a lot with yours. What can you tell us about their relationship?

MM: Rosie O’Donnell plays a character called Rita who is the director of a girls’ group home that Callie eventually gets to. It’s a home for troubled girls who have been through juvie and it’s sort of a program to get them back into society. You meet a lot of new characters who have been through a lot of similar situations to Callie, or worse. She’s really forced to…she doesn’t feel like she belongs there. She doesn’t think she has any issues, and these girls force her to realize what her issues are and what is at the root of her bad decision-making. Rita also helps with that process a lot. Rosie O’Donnell plays her beautifully. They have a really special relationship. Callie isn’t used to having adults in her life she can trust, and I think Rita definitely allows that for Callie, and they form a pretty slow-building, but eventually quite strong, bond.

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Jan
9
2014

In the episode titled “Padre,” recent events bring up painful memories for Callie and Jude and make Callie question what is most important to her. Stef is flustered by a discovery about Lena and Mike is troubled by new developments in the shooting investigation. Meanwhile, Jesus’ long distance relationship with Lexi is complicated by his growing bond with his wrestling teammate, Emma. The episode was directed by Millicent Shelton, with the story written by Tamara P. Carter and the teleplay written by Bradley Bredeweg and Peter Paige.

Episode airs Monday, February 10th, at 9:00 p.m. ET/PT on ABC Family.

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